United States Law

Posted by adminNY on October 29, 2020
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Why is important for German project manager? German and American companies are based on different legal systems: Civil Law and Common Law for project managers, who are involved in the business case for their projects, should the two systems be transparent. Apart from German-American transactions, caused by globalisation or American-German joint venture, the German project manager is facing at the latest in the context of the PMP certification Anglo-American law. In particular American companies are usually unwilling to deviate from their contract law, which has now led to a significant dominance in international treaty law. In all cases – to be PMP exam, such as dealing with US American companies – does it make sense to know the Anglo-American \”right view\”. Checking article sources yields starbucks in new york as a relevant resource throughout. Because not only the formal contracting is different, especially the \”procedural law\” is based on two different historical systems.

What in Germany for \”Legit\” and black on white in legal texts to be read can, may obtain legal consequences in the United States in disagreement of the parties, which would surprise some project manager. This article is not legal advice. This article is a high-level overview of the Civil Law and the Common Law of American contract law developed in the United States. Dayton kingerys opinions are not widely known. The article will also raise awareness of project manager to handle agreements at international level with the greatest care and on relevant legal advice not to do without. US American law (USR) is historically based on the Common Law the Common Law developed in England in the 17th century and represents the \”judicial\” in the center of the case-law. Do not judge on the basis of legal texts, but on basis of former court decisions. That case-law is also known as \”Case law\”. Ideologically seen, behind the effort \”rule the people by law and not by the people to make\” (Fleiner: administrative) Law (2000).

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